Vol. 14    Issue 04   01 - 31 September 2019
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Professor A. R. MOMIN

Tunisia: Discontents of the Jasmine Revolution

December 17, 2010 will be reckoned as a turning point in the history of the Arab region. On that day, Mohammed Bouaziz, a young educated Tunisian who eked out a living by selling fruits on a handcart, set himself on fire after being harassed and slapped by a municipal inspector who confiscated his handcart and fruits. He eventually died on January 4. The event triggered an unprecedented wave of protests and demonstrations across Tunisia. The police caned the rampaging mobs, used teargas shells to disperse them and even opened fire, killing at least 78 civilians. Following mass protests across the country, Tunisia’s long-time president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country on 14 January 2011.   Read more

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Which Generation Owns Kazakstan’s Future?

Half of Kazakhstan is under 29, which means young people are the future more than ever. But can they make their voices heard in a country where old-world values still rule?

Kazakh entrepreneur Zaure Rozmat still remembers the first time she hired a baby boomer. It was also her last. “In her eyes, everyone [in our office] was basically still kids,” Rozmat says. “When you hire an older person, they treat you as a young person: like you don’t know anything.”

Rozmat, 28, is hardly the only person to feel discounted in Kazakhstan due to her age – it’s a common feeling among Kazakh youth. Despite owning a successful media company in Almaty, Rozmat often feels that some people – whether employees, clients or potential investors – refuse to take her seriously because she is a millennial.   Read more

Malaysia is fighting for its billion-dollar palm oil industry

There are concerns over an EU law that aims to curb deforestation by phasing out the oil from renewable fuel by 2030.

On the morning of February 26, executives from a Washington consultancy presented a strategy paper to some of the most powerful officials in the Malaysian palm oil industry.

The message: Don't allow environmental activists and Western governments to tarnish palm oil to the extent that it ends up a pariah product, like tobacco.

The $60bn palm oil trade has been vilified by environmentalists because of the vast areas of tropical rainforest they say have been cleared to grow the commodity, which is consumed by billions of people.   Read more

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Sir Shah Muhammad Sulaiman: Legacy of a polymath

AMITABHA BHATTACHARYA

How little we know of our own distinguished men and women. How frequently we eulogise false gods, especially in the fields of politics and entertainment. How indifferent we are to the real makers of our nation.   Read more

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